Are You Ready for National Fetch Day? | #MakeFetchHappen #NationalFetchDay

Gretchen Wieners may not have been able to make fetch happen in the classic cult comedy Mean Girls, but just watch as determined dogs from coast to coast turn the phrase into their own pet holiday:…

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DogTipper

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The Salukis

One week ago today, Jenna and I went to Pittsburgh to pick up some puppies at the airport. We found ourselves at some desolate warehouse place, but yes, they had our delivery from Albuquerque.

They loaded the shipping box into our van. Zoom, the old whippet, raised his head to watch the proceedings, and out of that crate rose of cacophony of primitive puppy barks.

The barker was the brindle named Streamer but called “Baz” at his breeder’s home. He had gone through enough moves and jostles, and to be face to face with that short-eared dog was the last straw.

Jenna quickly got both pups out of the crate. Streamer glowered at me from the passenger seat, but the other puppy, the cream and white Mango, stared up at me with abject suspicious. “You’re not gonna eat me, are you?” his eyes seemed to ask.

And I drove them home. Mango decided that I was his safety, and he began to follow me from room to room. Streamer, a hot-blooded Arabian stallion of a pup, decided to snap at the old whippet on the sofa, and he received a muzzle snap for his impudence..

Thus began my journey with an even more different sort of dog.  I should add that these are not normal AKC salukis, but they are a cross between a tazi with ancestors from Kazakhstan and Middle Eastern or “desert bred salukis.” Their sire is Tavi, a dog that has been featured on the Qurencia blog many times. Their mother is brindle and white, and thus controversial to the saluki purists. Both live with Shiri Hoshen in New Mexico, and this is the first litter produced between the two parents.

Mango is not ours. He will be going through a vaccine and titer regime over the next few months before he will be send to live with a good friend of this blog in Australia.

But right now, Mango is just learning about this foreign land, where the grass is green and spongy, and the rain drops from the sky regularly and make the air cool and crisp.

He is learning about wolf-like dogs with prick ears and intense eyes, and drop-eared almost Saluki-like things that carry things in their mouths. He will need much socialization to be made ready for that long trip Down Under.

But he has the softest, brownest eyes I’ve ever seen on a dog. He will be a great dog. I just hope to do him justice.

Streamer will be staying here, and I hope will be reformed into a nice high status dog.

/And so I will learn a new breed once again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural History

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A Brief History of the Flea

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Boxes, Bags, & BUB!

Ever brought home a new (read: expensive) toy for your cat only to see the new plaything rejected in favor of the box or bag it came in? And if you weren’t so darn amused by watching your cat chase the receipt in the bottom of the bag you’d be really mad, right?

Yep, boxes and bags are a big hit. Experts cite numerous innate reasons for the attraction.

  • Concealment. Cats are predators, so these hiding spaces make it easier for them to surprise their prey—like your dog or maybe even you!
  • Stress relief. If I fits, I sits, right? Hardly claustrophobic, studies show that cats find comfort in any space they can squeeze themselves into. Maybe there’s someone new in your home or a conflict with another family member, your cat can find security in a box or bag.
  • Warmth. Quite literally, it’s warmer inside. Cardboard is a great insulator and bags can get warm quickly—just be sure your cat can get out!
  • Me-time. Your cat doesn’t have to be a total introvert to enjoy playing alone. Alone in a confined space, your cat gets to make up his or her own rules of play.

Recreation. While simple to us, cats can see all the possibilities for fun in a box or a bag—peeping, pouncing, teasing, crinkling, chewing, and even sleeping. See how Lil BUB traps giant Spooky in a bag!

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How to Keep Your Dog Calm on Halloween #AdaptilDog

This post is sponsored by CEVA Animal Health, makers of ADAPTIL® for dogs. All statements and opinions are entirely our own. As always, we only share products that we use with our own pets! This…

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DogTipper

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It was an ordinary Monday morning

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Dog-Friendly Halloween Events 2018

Halloween 2018 is just around the corner, and to celebrate we’ve fetched news of a few of the most frightfully fun Fido-centric festivities taking place across the country that you and your dog…

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DogTipper

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Lucky, Indeed

These are not my dogs, but I think seeing them at the end of a business trip or even after a busy day would make everything worth it! Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Dachshund has a new skull and a cancer-free life thanks to 3-D printing

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Is Vegan Dog Food Healthy?

Vegan dog food

This is probably the most common question concerned pet parents ask when discussing plant-based dog food. This is for good reason, of course, because no matter the motivations behind feeding a plant-based food, we all want to be certain that it will be healthy for our companions!

Let’s break it down piece by piece and explore why this question is asked as well as what the answer will be.

Don’t dogs need meat?
Domesticated dogs evolved from wolves, and both species are taxonomically classified under the Order Carnivora. While this makes them sound like meat-eating carnivores, the Order Carnivora not only includes true carnivores like the Felidae family, but also omnivores like the Canidae family, and even the Ailuropodiae family – which includes herbivorous pandas! Furthermore, domesticated dogs evolved from naturally omnivorous wolves whose co-evolution with humans resulted in an adaptation of their digestive system to a more starch-rich diet. That’s right, Fido and Spot have been eating our scraps for tens of thousands of years, and they are very well suited for it.

In animal nutrition, we really prefer to talk about nutrient requirements, as opposed to ingredient requirements. Research on the nutrient requirements of dogs extends back to the first National Research Council publication on the topic in 1953. Since that time, independent researchers, industry researchers and veterinarians have all been continuing to fine-tune our knowledge and understanding of just exactly what dogs need to be healthy and thrive. As far as we know, dogs have no requirement for meat per se, instead, they have a requirement for nutrients which may be obtained from meat, or from other sources.

So dogs need nutrients, not ingredients, but can they get all the nutrients they need from a vegan diet?
Yes. None of the essential nutrients required by dogs are found exclusively in animal tissues. Admittedly, some are found in high concentrations in animal tissues and may be more difficult to find elsewhere, but there is not a single essential nutrient for dogs which we cannot obtain from non-animal sources. The Association of American Feed Control Officials, known as AAFCO, has determined that the sufficiency of a diet to meet the nutritional requirements of dogs can be defined in two ways: the diet can be formulated to meet the industry recommendations or the diet can be tested by dogs themselves in a feeding trial. In terms of meeting nutritional requirements, any diet, regardless of ingredients, meeting either of these stipulations is recognized to be just as sufficient as any other diet meeting AAFCO’s ‘complete and balanced’ criteria. What this means, is that a plant-based diet bearing an AAFCO statement of adequacy contains all of the essential nutrients required by the species and life-stage denoted on the statement.

Furthermore, not only are plant-based diets, like Halo’s Holistic Garden of Vegan, suitable for healthy dogs, but plant-based diets have even been used extensively in veterinary practice to diagnose and/or manage common diseases, as Dr. Heinze, a board certified veterinary nutritionist, mentions in her rebuttal to a popular criticism of vegan dogs back in 2016. Animal-derived proteins are some of the most common allergens in dogs, making plant-based diets a fantastic option for diagnosing and managing dietary hypersensitivity. A handful of meat-free vegetarian diets also exist, though these contain eggs, dairy, or other animal products not directly associated with slaughter. These diets may not be as useful from a veterinary perspective, and are not typically as popular as strictly plant-based diets are, since many people choose to feed a meat-free diet to avoid the inherent cruelty to animals stemming from animal-derived products.

Alright, dogs can survive on vegan diets, but can they thrive?
When people ask if plant-based diets are healthy, this is really what they are asking most of the time. Sure, dogs can live on plant-based diets, I think just about everyone can agree on that point. BUT, will they be as healthy, as full of energy, as shiny and bouncy, as a dog fed a diet containing animals products?

The answer to this really depends on two things: what diet was the dog eating before, and what plant-based diet are you looking to switch them to? When you’re looking to switch your dog’s diet, there are a handful of considerations to keep in mind. Are you changing the diet because of a health or wellness problem, such as a dry coat or fat intolerance? Or are you happy with how your dog is faring on their current diet, but would like to switch to a suitable plant-based diet? In both cases, check the nutritional information provided by both diets and make sure that the nutrients of most interest to you will be the either the same or improved in the new diet you are selecting. For healthy dogs, the customer help line, provided by the company whose diet you are looking to try, can be a valuable resource, as you can discuss your dog’s individual needs and determine which diet is best for them. For dogs with a health condition, always discuss dietary changes with your veterinarian.

I hope this has served to illustrate that complete and balanced plant-based dog food is indeed healthy. For a more in-depth discussion, I encourage interested parties to read this review of plant-based vs. animal-based diets published by a veterinarian in an open-access peer-reviewed journal: www.mdpi.com/2076-2615/6/9/57/htm.

Dr. Sarah DoddDr. Sarah Dodd is a veterinarian with a special focus on companion animal nutrition. Her studies have taken her around the world living in England, Scotland, New Zealand, Australia, the United States of America and Canada – where she currently reside with her three happy rescue dogs Peppa, Dottie and Timmy.

She graduated from veterinary school in 2016, since then she has pursued her passion in nutrition with a clinical nutrition internship and a Master’s degree at the Ontario Veterinary College. She is currently completing her nutrition residency with the European College of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition and enrolled in a PhD studying plant-based diets for pets.

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